Book 35: The Book of General Ignorance by John Lloyd and John Mitchinson (2006)

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 Hello, people. I’m back.

We will start today with one of the best books I have ever read. It is as informative as it is well written. It corrects several myths that have persisted and informs us on facts that we would never have bothered to look up on our own. Among other things, I learned that that we have at least nine senses, there are at least fourteen states of matter (as opposed to just solid, liquid, and gas), and Alexander Fleming wasn’t the one who discovered penicillin. A particularly memorable phrase is the authors’ description of the Oompa Loompa as “multicolored futuristic punks with Mohawks hairdos.” I’ll certainly remember that for a long, long time.

All in all, a very nice book. A quick read and I was sorry I finished it so fast.

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Movie 12: The Grudge 2 (2006)

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I hate horror movies for two reasons:
– There’s a certain predictability to them.
– And yet in spite of the expected, they never fail to scare me.

The Grudge 2 isn’t especially chilling. It has its moments, but after a while, do you really expect me to be scared of a Japanese-looking woman who doesn’t know the concept of a comb? Moreover, it’s very confusing. It skips from one place to another without any real transition. But since you know they’re going to be related somehow, you don’t find it surprising when the weird neighbor turns out to be the new student who has moved back from Japan. Also, how is that old woman in the mountains able to speak English? It defies logic. Even the presumably well-educated nurses/receptionist at a modern hospital look at each other when Aubrey ask them a simple question: “Do you speak English?”

On that note, two things crossed my mind when the boy who played Eason shows up to help her out. First, OMGWTF he is cute. Second, He doesn’t even look Japanese. Do you people really expect me to believe he’s Japanese? Yes, I’m one of those people who can tell a Southeast Asian’s ethnicity by looking at his/her face. I was someone soothed when he turns out to be from Hong Kong. And I was mildly surprised when I found out the actor’s name is Edison Chen. The Edison Chen I’ve heard so much about? I’m understanding the hype now.

All in all, it was an okay movie. Not all that bad, but could’ve been better.

Book 23: Icons of Evolution by Jonathan Wells (2000)

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I don’t really know enough science to respond to any of the claims found in this book. I just can’t help feeling that this sounds like a conspiracy theory. Since this was published in 2000, every point that Wells makes has probably been refuted to death by the experts. I’ll do some more research on the book.

Book 10: Down the Rabbit Hole by Peter Abrahams (2005)

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I may not know anything about mystery, but I know terrible writing when I see one. Ingrid is one of the most one-dimensional characters I’ve ever encountered. She’s thirteen (or eleven – I may be confusing her with another character of a book I recently read), but she doesn’t sound like one at all. I find it really hard to relate to her the way I could easily relate to other female protagonists in a juvenile novel. I’m not even sure if this book qualified to be a juvenile novel (my library marks it as one). You can definitely tell that the narrative is written by an adult male who has no idea how it’s like to be a teenage girl. This book should probably be a book for adults about children, or something. I may appreciate it when I’m older, but not now.

Book 8: Size 12 Is Not Fat by Meg Cabot (2006)

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This is actually pretty good. I was expecting for the main character to moan on and on over her weight and her inability to get a date and how shallow men are (it is a chicklit), but it is actually only part of the story. Heather Wells is a former pop teen star who now works at a dorm. She’s not that smart, but she’s not annoyingly stupid either. This book is also better because it’s not in a diary format.As far as mystery goes, I don’t know how good or not good the book is. I don’t read mystery. I’m going to give Meg Cabot some points though. After everything else she has written, this is totally a step up. Maybe she should start combining regular chicklit with something from now on.

(I was even almost tempted to pick up the sequel: Size 14 Is Not Fat Either. Maybe later.)